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Archive: November, 2019

Nov. 20, 2019

Erik Gartzke's new article on "Blood and Robots: How Remotely Piloted Vehicles and Related Technologies Affect the Politics of Violence"

New technologies such as Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPVs) make it possible to remove human beings from direct involvement in combat. How will this evolving dynamic affect the practice and purposes of political violence? Will conflict become ‘costless’ in human terms as machines replace people on the front lines or will the logic of war continue to

Nov. 14, 2019

Minerva-funded reseachers will present key findings at the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies

Minerva-funded researcher, Charles Glaser and colleagues will present key findings related to Minerva-funded project "Spheres of Influence and Regional Orders: Assessing Approaches for Responding to China's Rise" at the Institute of Security and Conflict Studies symposium on "International Order and Means of Influence as China Rises" on Thursday, September 21st.

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Robert Jervis's new article, "On the Current Confrontation with Iran"
By Robert Jervis | Jan. 13, 2020
Most obviously, humility is in order. Those of us of a certain age can remember when many thought that the 1972 mining of Hanoi and Haiphong would lead to something worse than the Cuban missile crisis. In the mid-1980s, few analysts thought the Cold War would soon end. Many journalists and not a few scholars claim deep knowledge of the Middle East and the ability to predict how everyone will react, but we should recognize that the layer of regional expertise in the United States is...
Minerva researchers' new article on "Exploring the Social-Ecological Factors that Mobilize Children into Violence"
By Emma Cardeli, Mia Bloom, Sarah Gillespie, Tanya Zayed, and B. Heidi Ellis | Dec. 20, 2019
This article applies the social-ecological model to children’s mobilization into two violent groups—Central American gangs and terrorist organizations. While these two groups clearly differ in important ways, there are contextual similarities that frame a child’s involvement in each. For example, both flourish in low-resource settings where governmental structures may have been weakened or disrupted. Does it follow, therefore, that similar processes are at play in relation to children engaging in violent groups?

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