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Archive: January, 2020

Jan. 30, 2020

Owl in the Olive Tree post on "It Takes Social Science to Counter the Power of Russia's Malign Influence Campaign"

Minerva-funded researchers Scott Atran, Richard Davis, and Hasan Davulcu's Owl in the Olive Tree post on "It Takes Social Science to Counter the Power of Russia's Malign Influence Campaign". Despite recent technical innovations, such as the use of social media, Russia’s current malign influence campaigns follow those of its Soviet predecessor. Unless we understand these strategies, we remain vulnerable to them. The new National Security Strategy acknowledges the return of great power competition along with...

Jan. 13, 2020

Robert Jervis's new article, "On the Current Confrontation with Iran"

Most obviously, humility is in order. Those of us of a certain age can remember when many thought that the 1972 mining of Hanoi and Haiphong would lead to something worse than the Cuban missile crisis. In the mid-1980s, few analysts thought the Cold War would soon end. Many journalists and not a few scholars claim deep knowledge of the Middle East and the ability to predict how everyone will react, but we should recognize that the layer of regional expertise in the United States is...

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Applications for USIP's 2022-2023 Peace Scholar Competition is Now Open
By Toni Haynes | Sept. 16, 2021
In collaboration with the United States Institute of Peace, Minerva offers several programs for researchers at US universities working on topics related to peace, conflict, security, and stability. Currently, the program awards up to 18 scholarships per year, and awards support both research and writing stages of work on dissertations.
Steven Lobell discusses his Minerva-funded research in recent interview with UC San Diego
By Steven Lobell | Sept. 13, 2021
In the latest Alumni Confidential, Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation (IGCC) dissertation fellow (1996-97) Steven Lobell, a professor of political science at the University of Utah and expert in U.S. grand strategy, international security, and great power competition talks about what the early years of academic life are (really) like, and why being an IGCC fellow helped him get a head start. He also shares emerging findings from his new Minerva-funded research on why some near crises escalate into full-blown conflict—and why others don’t—and how escalation can be avoided.

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