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Archive: February, 2021

Feb. 17, 2021

How History Predicts COVID-19’s Impact on Maritime Piracy, and What America Can do to Help

Minerva-funded researcher, Brandon Prins recent article discusses how previous financial crises have been followed by significant surges in maritime crime and that the economic impacts of the novel Coronavirus will likely do the same.

Feb. 12, 2021

Rethinking “Alliances”: The Case of South Africa as a Rising Power

How does South Africa view international alliances? International relations (IR) scholars have been debating the end of alliances and the relevance of the alliance paradigm itself. South Africa presents an excellent test case for advancing these debates for three reasons.

Feb. 11, 2021

Minerva-funded researchers new publication, Pirate Lands

Minerva-funded researchers, Ursula Daxecker and Brandon Prins demonstrate in their new publication, Pirate Lands that Maritime piracy-like civil war, terrorism, and organized crime-is a problem of weak states

Feb. 3, 2021

The "Pandemic Textbook" Must Include Decision-Making

Minerva-funded researcher, Neil D. Shortland and Laurence Alison recent article discusses why good pandemic management requires goal-directed least-worst decision-making. As scientists who study decision-making early on, they realized that what the COVID-19 pandemic required was rapid "least-worst" goal-directed decision-making.

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Applications for USIP's 2022-2023 Peace Scholar Competition is Now Open
By Toni Haynes | Sept. 16, 2021
In collaboration with the United States Institute of Peace, Minerva offers several programs for researchers at US universities working on topics related to peace, conflict, security, and stability. Currently, the program awards up to 18 scholarships per year, and awards support both research and writing stages of work on dissertations.
Steven Lobell discusses his Minerva-funded research in recent interview with UC San Diego
By Steven Lobell | Sept. 13, 2021
In the latest Alumni Confidential, Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation (IGCC) dissertation fellow (1996-97) Steven Lobell, a professor of political science at the University of Utah and expert in U.S. grand strategy, international security, and great power competition talks about what the early years of academic life are (really) like, and why being an IGCC fellow helped him get a head start. He also shares emerging findings from his new Minerva-funded research on why some near crises escalate into full-blown conflict—and why others don’t—and how escalation can be avoided.

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