HomeMinerva News

Feb. 11, 2020

Michael Allen's new article, "Outside the Wire: U.S. Military Deployments and Public Opinion in Host States"

How do citizens within countries hosting U.S. military personnel view that presence? Using new cross-national survey data from 14 countries, we examine how different forms of exposure to a U.S. military presence in a country affect attitudes toward the U.S. military, government, and people. We find that contact with U.S. military personnel or the receipt of economic benefits from the U.S. presence correlates with stronger support for the U.S. presence, people, and government.

Feb. 6, 2020

Michael Horowitz's new article on "The AI Literacy Gap Hobbling American Officialdom"

Minerva-funded researcher, Michael Horowitz and Lauren Kahn's new article on "The AI Literacy Gap Hobbling American Officialdom" discusses how a renewed emphasis on AI education for senior leaders that will help make key decisions about programs, funding, and adoption is essential for safe and effective U.S. adoption of AI in the national security sphere.

Feb. 4, 2020

The Role of Social Science Research in National Security

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (The National Academies) report on “The Role of Social Science Research in National Security” - highlights from three National Academies reports was released. This brief report discusses the national need for investing in basic research in social science and creating paths to integrate findings to inform national security actions and policies.

Jan. 30, 2020

Owl in the Olive Tree post on "It Takes Social Science to Counter the Power of Russia's Malign Influence Campaign"

Minerva-funded researchers Scott Atran, Richard Davis, and Hasan Davulcu's Owl in the Olive Tree post on "It Takes Social Science to Counter the Power of Russia's Malign Influence Campaign". Despite recent technical innovations, such as the use of social media, Russia’s current malign influence campaigns follow those of its Soviet predecessor. Unless we understand these strategies, we remain vulnerable to them. The new National Security Strategy acknowledges the return of great power competition along with...

Jan. 13, 2020

Robert Jervis's new article, "On the Current Confrontation with Iran"

Most obviously, humility is in order. Those of us of a certain age can remember when many thought that the 1972 mining of Hanoi and Haiphong would lead to something worse than the Cuban missile crisis. In the mid-1980s, few analysts thought the Cold War would soon end. Many journalists and not a few scholars claim deep knowledge of the Middle East and the ability to predict how everyone will react, but we should recognize that the layer of regional expertise in the United States is...

Dec. 20, 2019

Minerva researchers' new article on "Exploring the Social-Ecological Factors that Mobilize Children into Violence"

This article applies the social-ecological model to children’s mobilization into two violent groups—Central American gangs and terrorist organizations. While these two groups clearly differ in important ways, there are contextual similarities that frame a child’s involvement in each. For example, both flourish in low-resource settings where governmental structures may have been weakened or disrupted. Does it follow, therefore, that similar processes are at play in relation to children engaging in violent groups?

Dec. 18, 2019

Paul Staniland's new article on "India's New Security Order"

A crisis and a crackdown have defined India’s security policy in 2019. In February, the Indian Air Force launched an airstrike into Pakistan following a suicide bombing in Kashmir. This then led to a crisis, dogfights, and missile threats. In August, the government in New Delhi surged security forces into Indian-administered Jammu and Kashmir and revoked its special status, beginning months of detentions, restrictions, and claims about the beginning of a radically new politics in Kashmir.

Dec. 17, 2019

Owl in the Olive Tree post on "The Puzzle of International Intervention in Conflict-Affected States"

Minerva-funded researchers Jessica Piombo, Naazneen H. Barma, and Naomi Levy's Owl in the Olive Tree post on "The Puzzle of International Intervention in Conflict-Affected States". One of the conundrums of post-conflict interventions is that despite copious amounts of international assistance devoted to the dual enterprise of strengthening states and building peace, many post-conflict countries—such as Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Iraq, and South Sudan—remain either poorly governed, stubbornly insecure, or, worst of all, both. Perhaps even more puzzling, however, are countries like Uganda, where peace is lasting but governance...

Dec. 10, 2019

Eric McGlinchey's new article on "Questioning Sinophobia in Central Asia"

(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) Analysts have devoted considerable attention to the rise of Sinophobia in Central Asia.[1] Chinese loans, we are told, are forcing Central Asian states into ever-growing dependency on Beijing. Chinese companies setting up shop in Central Asia crowd out local industry and employ Chinese nationals rather than local residents. And to add insult to economic injury, China threatens Central Asians’ ethnonational future.

Dec. 9, 2019

Mia Bloom's new article on "No Place to Hide, No Place to Post: Lessons from Recent Efforts at "De-Platforming" ISIS

The online media platforms of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) blend graphic audiovisual content with religious writings to sanction and justify violent terrorist attacks throughout the world. ISIS has utilized propaganda to its advantage, not only to bolster its expansion in Iraq and Syria but also to recruit followers and disseminate the group’s ideology worldwide.

Keyword Search


Categories


Archives


Recent News

Michael Allen's new article, "Outside the Wire: U.S. Military Deployments and Public Opinion in Host States"
By Michael Allen, Michael E. Flynn, Carla Martinez Machain, and Andrew Stravers | Feb. 11, 2020
How do citizens within countries hosting U.S. military personnel view that presence? Using new cross-national survey data from 14 countries, we examine how different forms of exposure to a U.S. military presence in a country affect attitudes toward the U.S. military, government, and people. We find that contact with U.S. military personnel or the receipt of economic benefits from the U.S. presence correlates with stronger support for the U.S. presence, people, and government.
Michael Horowitz's new article on "The AI Literacy Gap Hobbling American Officialdom"
By Michael C. Horowitz and Lauren Kahn | Feb. 6, 2020
Minerva-funded researcher, Michael Horowitz and Lauren Kahn's new article on "The AI Literacy Gap Hobbling American Officialdom" discusses how a renewed emphasis on AI education for senior leaders that will help make key decisions about programs, funding, and adoption is essential for safe and effective U.S. adoption of AI in the national security sphere.

Minerva Social Media