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Archive: April, 2022

April 28, 2022

Exploring the Social-Ecological Factors that Mobilize Children into Violence

This article applies the social-ecological model to children’s mobilization into two violent groups—Central American gangs and terrorist organizations. While these two groups clearly differ in important ways, there are contextual similarities that frame a child’s involvement in each. For example, both flourish in low-resource settings where governmental structures may have been weakened or disrupted.

April 13, 2022

Minerva-funded Research Reveals How Misinformation can be Re-invigorated in Discourse Through the Novelty of a Major Event

Analysts of social media differ in their emphasis on the effects of message content versus social network structure. The balance of these factors may change substantially across time. When a major event occurs, initial independent reactions may give way to more social diffusion of interpretations of the event among different communities, including those committed to disinformation.

April 7, 2022

Rising Power Alliances team from the Fletcher School new publication "Brazilian alliance perspectives: towards a BRICS development–security alliance?"

This study examines Brazil’s perceptions by introducing and analyzing a new data set of Brazilian expert discourses on alliances since 1990 and using its participation in BRICS as an empirical case.

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Minerva-USIP Peace and Security Fellow Casey Mahoney's new article "Shared Responsibility: Enacting Military AI Ethics in U.S. Coalitions"
By Casey Mahoney | May 5, 2022
"AI is making human judgment in war more, not less, important. This means the United States and its allies and partners will need to innovate together, focusing on more than broad ethical principles and technical solutions."
Exploring the Social-Ecological Factors that Mobilize Children into Violence
By Mia Bloom | April 28, 2022
This article applies the social-ecological model to children’s mobilization into two violent groups—Central American gangs and terrorist organizations. While these two groups clearly differ in important ways, there are contextual similarities that frame a child’s involvement in each. For example, both flourish in low-resource settings where governmental structures may have been weakened or disrupted.

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