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Archive: March, 2021

March 30, 2021

Minerva-funded researcher, Dashun Wang's new book "The Science of Science"

Minerva-funded researcher, Dashun Wang's new book "The Science of Science" provides an unprecedented look at the nature of the discipline and how scientists can improve their work.

March 25, 2021

Minerva-funded researchers, Jason Healey and Robert Jervis on "How to Reverse Three Decades of Escalating Cyber Conflict"

Cyber conflict has not yet escalated from a fight inside cyberspace to a more traditional armed attack because of cyberspace. In part this is because countries understand there are some tacit upper limits to escalation above which the response from the offended country will be war. Unfortunately, this happy state may not last: Cyber conflict and competition are intensifying, increasing the chances of escalation into a true global crisis.

March 11, 2021

Colombia is letting hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans stay. What can other countries learn?

On Monday, the Biden administration granted 300,000 Venezuelan migrants in the United States the possibility of temporary protected status. Last month, Colombia announced a similar move affecting upward of 1 million who have fled Venezuela’s collapse to find work, education, health care and safety in Colombia. The Estatuto Temporal de Protección para Migrantes Venezolanos (ETPV) will provide migrants access to formal employment, hospitals, schools and vaccine programs.

March 4, 2021

Strategic Tradeoffs in U.S. Naval Force Structure - Rule the Waves or Wave the Flag?

In a recent article, "Strategic Tradeoffs in U.S. Naval Force Structure - Rule the Waves or Wave the Flag?", Minerva-funded researchers, Erik Gartzke and Jon Lindsay examine different aspects and implications of the recently released tri-service maritime strategy, Advantage at Sea: Prevailing with Integrated All-Domain Naval Power. This article is the fourth in a series of eight articles, “Maritime Strategy on the Rocks".

March 3, 2021

Biden called climate change an ‘existential threat.’ Can the U.N. Security Council help?

For the month of March, newly confirmed U.S. ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield will serve as the rotating president of the U.N. Security Council, where climate change has become an increasingly discussed topic. President Biden has called climate change an “existential threat” and emphasized its importance by appointing John F. Kerry as a special presidential envoy with a seat on the White House National Security Council.

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Applications for USIP's 2022-2023 Peace Scholar Competition is Now Open
By Toni Haynes | Sept. 16, 2021
In collaboration with the United States Institute of Peace, Minerva offers several programs for researchers at US universities working on topics related to peace, conflict, security, and stability. Currently, the program awards up to 18 scholarships per year, and awards support both research and writing stages of work on dissertations.
Steven Lobell discusses his Minerva-funded research in recent interview with UC San Diego
By Steven Lobell | Sept. 13, 2021
In the latest Alumni Confidential, Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation (IGCC) dissertation fellow (1996-97) Steven Lobell, a professor of political science at the University of Utah and expert in U.S. grand strategy, international security, and great power competition talks about what the early years of academic life are (really) like, and why being an IGCC fellow helped him get a head start. He also shares emerging findings from his new Minerva-funded research on why some near crises escalate into full-blown conflict—and why others don’t—and how escalation can be avoided.

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