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Feb. 17, 2017

Minerva researchers develop Rebel Contraband Dataset

Minerva researchers Justin Conrad, Beth Elise Whitaker, and James Igoe Walsh (University of North Carolina - Charlotte) have developed the first-ever Rebel Contraband Dataset as part of their Minerva-funded research. The dataset provides new and regularly updated annual data on rebel activities and control of natural resources and other illicit

Feb. 17, 2017

J Is For Jihad: How The Islamic State Indoctrinates Children With Math, Grammar, Tanks, and Guns

Robbie Gramer. 2017. J Is For Jihad: How The Islamic State Indoctrinates Children With Math, Grammar, Tanks, and Guns. Foreign Policy. February 16.

Feb. 6, 2017

The American Face of ISIS

A Special Report of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute.

Feb. 3, 2017

Rethinking the War on Terror, with the help of science

Robert Gebelhoff. 2017. Rethinking the War on Terror, with the help of science. Washington Post. February 3.

Feb. 2, 2017

Do Women Matter to National Security?

Monkey Cage, Washington Post. February 2.

Jan. 31, 2017

On the Edge: What Future for the African Sahel?

The 2017 Annual Carter Conference in African Studies Center for African Studies at the University of Florida February 23-25, 2017

Jan. 25, 2017

What Do Pirates Want? To Steal Riches at Sea So They Can Pay for Wars On Land

Brandon Prins, Ursula Daxecker, and Anup Phayal. 2017. What Do Pirates Want? To Steal Riches at Sea So They Can Pay for Wars on Land. Monkey Cage, Washington Post. January 25.

Jan. 17, 2017

Disentangling Aid Dynamics in Statebuilding and Peacebuiding: A Causal Framework

Naazneen H. Barma, Naomi Levy, and Jessica Piombo. 2016. Disentangling Aid Dynamics in Statebuilding and Peacebuiding: A Causal Framework. International Peacekeeping. 1-25. (DOI: 10.1080/13533312.2016.1252677)

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Robert Jervis's new article, "On the Current Confrontation with Iran"
By Robert Jervis | Jan. 13, 2020
Most obviously, humility is in order. Those of us of a certain age can remember when many thought that the 1972 mining of Hanoi and Haiphong would lead to something worse than the Cuban missile crisis. In the mid-1980s, few analysts thought the Cold War would soon end. Many journalists and not a few scholars claim deep knowledge of the Middle East and the ability to predict how everyone will react, but we should recognize that the layer of regional expertise in the United States is...
Minerva researchers' new article on "Exploring the Social-Ecological Factors that Mobilize Children into Violence"
By Emma Cardeli, Mia Bloom, Sarah Gillespie, Tanya Zayed, and B. Heidi Ellis | Dec. 20, 2019
This article applies the social-ecological model to children’s mobilization into two violent groups—Central American gangs and terrorist organizations. While these two groups clearly differ in important ways, there are contextual similarities that frame a child’s involvement in each. For example, both flourish in low-resource settings where governmental structures may have been weakened or disrupted. Does it follow, therefore, that similar processes are at play in relation to children engaging in violent groups?

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